Spell it right

If you have trouble keeping lose and loose straight … or if you tend to mix up then and than, or there, their and they’re, than then this page is for you: Ten Words You Need to Stop Misspelling.

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Copy Editing the World

I’ve been getting some questions about the Copy Edit the World assignment, the first installment of which (10 points worth) is due this Sunday. Here’s a link to the details of this assignment.

For this assignment, your task is find AP style errors, typos, misused words, and grammatical and punctuation errors in published materials or signage … and post them on your blog, along with your corrections. Note: You have to correct the error to get credit for this assignment.

This exercise will help you sharpen your editing eyes so you can catch errors in your own assignments … before you submit them, and lose points when I find them.

To help you get started, here are some errors I’ve run across lately. If you can spot and correct one of these errors, you can earn 2 points of extra credit. Just post your correction as a comment on this blog post. (One error and correction per person, please, so we can spread the extra credit around.)

I particularly like the first example shown above because it’s a correction that needs correcting — it contains another error. I spotted the one on the right in today’s SF Chronicle. I used to watch The Three Stooges on TV when I was a kid, so it was a fun read … except for that misused word (hint).

I found this error in an email from PoynterOnline, a journalism organization. Oops … setting a bad example!

Yes, I find errors on Facebook too. So can you.  (Solved by Jeff C. — good job!)


I figure Robert Redford must have been red-faced when he realized that his Sundance catalog holiday letter to customers contained an embarrassing error. Can you find it? It’s a funny one.

Copy Edit the World

Copy Edit the World

I’ve been getting some questions about Copy Edit the World submissions, since your first 10 points worth are due this week.

Here’s how to do it: Please link to the web page with the error (if it’s online) or take a photo of the item (poster, sign, brochure, menu, etc.) and post the photo on your blog. Either way, to get credit, you must identify and correct the error in your accompanying blog post.

Alternatively, if you’re on campus, you can hand-deliver a hard copy of the item in error during my office hours. Just be sure to put your name and the class info (Jour 61) on each submission, and identify and correct the error you’ve found.

Here’s one for practice. The first person (or people) to identify and correct (use the comment button to leave your correction) the errors in this photo gets two points extra credit per error.

Copy Edit the World!

Copy Edit the World!