Help is just a click away

If you haven’t explored the Resources page of this blog lately, you could be missing a bet.

For example, did you know you can download the pdf version of my PowerPoint presentation on broadcast writing? Could be a big help with this week’s broadcast writing assignments. For example, it will remind you that you’re supposed to use ALL CAPS when writing for broadcast.

You’ll find this link, along with a link to style rules for broadcast and a sample broadcast story, listed under “Broadcast” on the Resources page.

If you’re thinking of writing a review for your final magazine/multimedia project for this class, have you noticed that the Resources page includes a section on writing reviews?

You also might want to listen to one of America’s best storytellers, NPR’s Ira Glass, give his take on storytelling. You’ll find a link to that YouTube video listed under “Other Resources” … it’s just below the link to an excellent discussion of interviewing skills.

At the bottom of the Resources page you’ll find links to some interesting blogs. For example, if you check out Daniel Sato’s Photojournalism Blog (BTW, Sato is a JMC photojournalism grad), you’ll see that he’s just written a blog post that explains (and shows!) how to make your first map, using Mapnik or Google Maps.

Wouldn’t that make a fabulous “graphic extra” to accompany your final project for this class?

Wordcamp SF

Those of you who are using WordPress blogs might want to consider attending WordCamp San Francisco, which will be held Saturday, May 1, at Mission Bay Conference Center (UCSF) in San Francisco.

It’s just $50 for a full day’s worth of program sessions on blogging, WordPress blogs, social media and such … plus a great BBQ lunch and plenty of swag, including a swell T-shirt. (BTW, I’ll be there.)

Here’s where to find out more.

Copy Editing the World

I’ve been getting some questions about the Copy Edit the World assignment, the first installment of which (10 points worth) is due this Sunday. Here’s a link to the details of this assignment.

For this assignment, your task is find AP style errors, typos, misused words, and grammatical and punctuation errors in published materials or signage … and post them on your blog, along with your corrections. Note: You have to correct the error to get credit for this assignment.

This exercise will help you sharpen your editing eyes so you can catch errors in your own assignments … before you submit them, and lose points when I find them.

To help you get started, here are some errors I’ve run across lately. If you can spot and correct one of these errors, you can earn 2 points of extra credit. Just post your correction as a comment on this blog post. (One error and correction per person, please, so we can spread the extra credit around.)

I particularly like the first example shown above because it’s a correction that needs correcting — it contains another error. I spotted the one on the right in today’s SF Chronicle. I used to watch The Three Stooges on TV when I was a kid, so it was a fun read … except for that misused word (hint).

I found this error in an email from PoynterOnline, a journalism organization. Oops … setting a bad example!

Yes, I find errors on Facebook too. So can you.  (Solved by Jeff C. — good job!)


I figure Robert Redford must have been red-faced when he realized that his Sundance catalog holiday letter to customers contained an embarrassing error. Can you find it? It’s a funny one.